The find this week is an interesting selection rather than an item. While collecting the statistics for our Flickr account, I found an option that shows our photographs ranked by “interestingness”. I’m not sure how the interestingness is judged but I thought you might like to see what they were!

10. Piccadilly Gardens Bomb Shelters 1940

These bomb shelters were constructed not long before the Manchester Blitz. Modern day Piccadilly Gardens has a memorial tree to remember those killed in the long nights of December 22nd and 23rd 1940.

Piccadilly Gardens Bomb shelters 1940

9. Charles Street/Medlock Street, Chorlton On Medlock, 1903

This is one of my favourites. What on earth is going on in this picture? The comments on our Flickr page are very interesting too – clicking on the picture will take you there.

Charles Street/Medlock Street, Chorlton On Medlock, 1903

8. Central Library Tram Poster

By E. Wigglesworth. Manchester Municipal School of Art organised a competition to produce pictorial posters for the Manchester Corporation Transport Department trams and buses between 1933 and 1934. In all, eighteen designs were used; the corporation paid the School of Art two guineas in order to use them. Their unusual shape was designed to fit on the back of the driver’s cab. We love it so much, we’ve made it our avatar!

Central Library tram poster

7. Subsidence, Bridge Street, Ardwick, 29 July 1895

This is a brilliant photograph. If there was a large poster, I would buy it, frame it and gaze at it for hours. Again, the Flickr comments are very interesting.

Subsidence, Bridge Street, Ardwick, 29 July 1895

6. Victoria Bridge, Manchester by James Mudd, c.1864

Victoria Bridge was opened in 1839. It was named after Queen Victoria, but the lady herself didn’t manage to visit it until around 1851 (but we’ll forgive her as being Queen must be very time consuming). It replaced Salford Old Bridge which had been built in the 14th century at the site of a ford and is where the name Salford comes from.

Victoria Bridge, Manchester by James Mudd, c.1864 (GB124.Q38)

I’m feeling naughty this afternoon, so I’m going to make this a cliff hanger and keep you all waiting until next Friday to find out what the top five are. Feel free to tell us which your top five would be!

Advertisements